Album info

Album-Release:
2022

HRA-Release:
27.05.2022

Label: Driveonrecords

Genre: Jazz

Subgenre: Vocal

Artist: Lori Lieberman

Album including Album cover Booklet (PDF)

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Formats & Prices

FormatPriceIn CartBuy
FLAC 192 $ 14.40
  • 1You Go to My Head05:03
  • 2Moonlight in Vermont03:45
  • 3I Like the Likes Of You02:27
  • 4What Kind Of Fool Am I03:21
  • 5Truly03:49
  • 6It Might as well be Spring (C'est Le Printemps)03:13
  • 7Killing Me Softly05:19
  • 8You Are Not My First Love03:00
  • 9My One and Only Love03:58
  • 10She Knows Better02:57
  • 11Love's a Fragile Thing03:25
  • 12Que Será, Será03:08
  • Total Runtime43:25

Info for Truly



Truly, quite possibly Lori Lieberman's finest album to-date, both musically & sonically, is guaranteed to become an audiophile favorite. A potpourri of fresh covers from the American Songbook, sprinkled with new, original compositions, embellished by thoughtful arrangements, played by some of the finest musicians.

Eight songs are covers which Lori listened to with her father, while driving in Switzerland as a child, bopping to an eight track car stereo. Two originals were co-written forty years ago with Joe Harnell and never previously recorded. While there is one fresh composition, the title track “Truly” and a wonderful re-imagining of Lori’s classic - “Killing Me Softly”. Matt Rollings gorgeous jazz improvisation on piano opens the song, later the song is fleshed out by David Pitch (bass), Victor Indrizzo (drums) & Lyle Workman (guitar). I have heard Lori perform this song many times live. The original version, recorded when Lori was 19, sounds truly dated; over produced with excessive reverb on the the vocals. I first heard this on her “A Thousand Dreams” CD, recorded by Mark Levinson with two microphones; an audiophile favorite. Then the beautiful version on “Gun Metal Sky” with a gorgeous Spanish guitar and tasteful backing vocals. But the Truly version adds 21’st century sophistication and takes this classic song to a whole new level. The interplay between vocals, piano & guitar is sublime and so tasteful. Hats off to Matt Rollings for a gorgeous arrangement. Lori’s new version is the most heartfelt and brought Bob Clearmountain to tears.

Joe Cali, executive producer, assembled a grammy award winning crew for Truly. Lori ’s voice is in shockingly fine form, but wait until you hear Matt Rollings on piano & Hammond B-3 organ and the amazing Lyle Workman on guitar. The album was co-produced by Lori Lieberman and Matt Rollings. Recorded & mixed by Bob Clearmountain and mastered by Darcy Proper. This is Lori’s finest sounding album by an Irish mile.

Lori’s “Moonlight In Vermont” sounds remarkably fresh and current. The song opens with Matt Rollings piano which provides a wonderful counterpoint to her singing. When the rhythm section and Lyle Workman on guitar join in, the party starts to swing. Lyle Workman’s twenty second guitar sorbet is clean & refreshing, every note tugs at your heart. We are talking goosebumps territory here. Lori continues singing with the band in full swing - it’s glorious. Here singing displays maturity & delivers wonderful shades of emotion & passion.

From a technical POV, the album was recorded live at Apogee Studios by Bob Clearmountain using a much revered Neve analogue mixing console. Lori’s voice was mic’d with a Neumann M49 (tube) on the vocals, and a Neumann U67 on the guitars. There are NO overdubs, the synergy between the musicians is palpable. Lori is singing her heart out, I have never heard her singing better. Lori Lieberman has matured beautifully and found real character in her performance.

As for the sound quality, expect a lovely black background, three-dimensional soundstage, with beautiful rich tone, carefully crafted sound quality by grammy award winning engineers; it’s a top shelf project and it sounds it.

"It's taken the half-century since her eponymous debut, but Lori Lieberman — who always was a hybrid of singer-songwriter and performer of others' compositions — has revealed yet another masterful talent, seasoned by the passing of decades. As revealed on Truly, her way with a handful of standards begs for even more. From the opening notes of 'You Go To My Head', Lori emerges as an impeccable yet sensitive interpreter of classics from the Great American Songbook and beyond. If you loved the way Carly Simon and Linda Ronstadt looked to the gems of an earlier era, you're in for a thrill." (Ken Kessler)

"Truly, is, in my opinion, Lori Lieberman's finest album to-date, both musically and sonically guaranteed to become an audiophile favorite. A potpourri of fresh covers of the American Songbook, sprinkled with new, original compositions, embellished by original arrangements, played by some of the finest musicians, Truly was recorded, mixed and mastered to perfection." (On A Higher Note)

"When Lori told me about her idea to record an album of standards with a small Quartet led by Matt Rollings on piano, my first realization was that we couldn’t do this in our normal studio. This had to be performed live. I contacted my good friends- the legendary engineer, Bob Clearmountain and Betty Bennett, who is one of the founders of Apogee Digital, which creates the most wonderful professional audio devices in the world, delivering the ultimate sound and quality. I asked if the space would be available for a 6-day period for a live recording. It was an intense high-pressure schedule, but I told them of our concept and how Apogee Studio, well, had “Magic.” The control room had Bob’s original Neve board, the classic recording console, and had an amazing stock of classic tube and solid- state microphones. And to add to it, Bob said he would like to engineer and mix the project. The first day we arrived I knew this was a pairing of musicians and technicians made in heaven. It was an incredible collaboration right from the start. I am confident you will enjoy every note." (Joseph Cali)

Lori Lieberman, vocals, acoustic guitar
Matt Rollings, piano, Hammond B-3
Lyle Workman, guitar
David Piltch, bass
Victor Indrizzo, drums


Recorded Live at Apogee Studios
Engineered and mixed by Bob Clearmountain
Produced by Lori Lieberman, Matt Rollings
Executive produced by Joseph Cali


Lori Lieberman
Born in Los Angeles but raised in Switzerland, Lieberman expressed her feelings early on in journals and in song. One of three sisters, her early musical influences began with Donovan, Francoise Hardy, and Dionne Warwick, but her inspirations shifted when her sister returned from college in Maine, and gifted Lori with her favorite music from U.S. which included Joni Mitchell, Judy Collins, and Tom Rush. “I finally felt at home with their musical sensibilities and their writing really reached into my heart, “ she says. She began to write her own material, playing in high school bands and later, in college in Boston, before landing her first record deal with Capitol Records in the early 1970s.

Lieberman went on to record five more albums for Capitol (Lori Lieberman, Becoming, A Piece of Time, Straw Colored Girl, and The Best of Lori Lieberman), which featured a young Larry Carlton, Joe Sample, Merry Clayton, and members of the LA Express, to name a few. She toured extensively throughout the U.S. and Europe, along with Billy Joel, Randy Newman, John Sebastian, and others. However, it was her association with a little known New York–based record label, Millennium/RCA, that she was most encouraged to step away from the mainstream. Under Jimmy Ienner’s guidance, she wrote one of her most candid collections of songs entitled Letting Go.

As the styles of the music industry changed from James Taylor to disco, Ms. Lieberman struggled to create music that fit in. “One awful meeting led to another until the day I walked into a publisher’s office,” she says, recalling the moment she called it quits. “He put his hand up as if to say, ‘hold on’ while he continued to discuss his dinner plans. I waited, got up, and left. I remember thinking, ‘I’m done.’ And I was.” With a mischievous laugh, she adds, “The same publisher is now a realtor and has friend-requested me on Facebook… I think I’ll make him wait!”

Lieberman focused on her family life, the mother of three children (Em, Daniel, and Will), and stayed away from the music business for the next 15 years. She regards that time as one of the happiest and most fulfilling of all, and yet, she secretly kept on writing songs that no one heard, in her small studio in the upstairs corner of her home.

Her music took a backseat until producer and audiophile, Joseph Cali, coaxed a reluctant Lieberman out of the shadows, and got her singing again. In the time spent away from the music business, Cali was surprised to find that she had continued writing, putting her thoughts and music in her secret archive. He had an idea to involve his former partner in Cello Music and Film, engineer Mark Levinson, to create a two-mic live experience with Lieberman for the audiophile community.



<#!EN!#

Lori Lieberman
Born in Los Angeles but raised in Switzerland, Lieberman expressed her feelings early on in journals and in song. One of three sisters, her early musical influences began with Donovan, Francoise Hardy, and Dionne Warwick, but her inspirations shifted when her sister returned from college in Maine, and gifted Lori with her favorite music from U.S. which included Joni Mitchell, Judy Collins, and Tom Rush. “I finally felt at home with their musical sensibilities and their writing really reached into my heart, “ she says. She began to write her own material, playing in high school bands and later, in college in Boston, before landing her first record deal with Capitol Records in the early 1970s.

Lieberman went on to record five more albums for Capitol (Lori Lieberman, Becoming, A Piece of Time, Straw Colored Girl, and The Best of Lori Lieberman), which featured a young Larry Carlton, Joe Sample, Merry Clayton, and members of the LA Express, to name a few. She toured extensively throughout the U.S. and Europe, along with Billy Joel, Randy Newman, John Sebastian, and others. However, it was her association with a little known New York–based record label, Millennium/RCA, that she was most encouraged to step away from the mainstream. Under Jimmy Ienner’s guidance, she wrote one of her most candid collections of songs entitled Letting Go.

As the styles of the music industry changed from James Taylor to disco, Ms. Lieberman struggled to create music that fit in. “One awful meeting led to another until the day I walked into a publisher’s office,” she says, recalling the moment she called it quits. “He put his hand up as if to say, ‘hold on’ while he continued to discuss his dinner plans. I waited, got up, and left. I remember thinking, ‘I’m done.’ And I was.” With a mischievous laugh, she adds, “The same publisher is now a realtor and has friend-requested me on Facebook… I think I’ll make him wait!”

Lieberman focused on her family life, the mother of three children (Em, Daniel, and Will), and stayed away from the music business for the next 15 years. She regards that time as one of the happiest and most fulfilling of all, and yet, she secretly kept on writing songs that no one heard, in her small studio in the upstairs corner of her home.

Her music took a backseat until producer and audiophile, Joseph Cali, coaxed a reluctant Lieberman out of the shadows, and got her singing again. In the time spent away from the music business, Cali was surprised to find that she had continued writing, putting her thoughts and music in her secret archive. He had an idea to involve his former partner in Cello Music and Film, engineer Mark Levinson, to create a two-mic live experience with Lieberman for the audiophile community.

Booklet for Truly

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