Shostakovich: The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a & Love and Hate, Op. 38 Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz & Mark Fitz-Gerald

Cover Shostakovich: The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a & Love and Hate, Op. 38

Album Info

Album Veröffentlichung:
2019

HRA-Veröffentlichung:
08.11.2019

Label: Naxos

Genre: Classical

Subgenre: Orchestral

Das Album enthält Albumcover Booklet (PDF)

?

Formate & Preise

FormatPreisIm WarenkorbKaufen
FLAC 48 $ 12,80
  • Dmitri Shostakovich (1906 - 1975): The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 1 "The Year 1929":
  • 1The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 1 "The Year 1929": I. March02:33
  • 2The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 1 "The Year 1929": II. Foxtrot (Orch. M. Fitz-Gerald)02:26
  • 3The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 1 "The Year 1929": III. Galop (Orch. M. Fitz-Gerald)02:22
  • 4The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 1 "The Year 1929": IV. Waltz No. 1 (Orch. M. Fitz-Gerald)00:58
  • 5The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 1 "The Year 1929": V. Intermezzo03:11
  • 6The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 1 "The Year 1929": VI. Wedding Scene05:39
  • 7The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 1 "The Year 1929": VII. Fire01:07
  • 8The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 1 "The Year 1929": VIII. Fire Signals00:37
  • 9The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 1 "The Year 1929": IX. Firemen's Choir00:48
  • The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 2 "50 Years Later, the Year 1979":
  • 10The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 2 "50 Years Later, the Year 1979": X. Scene in the Public Garden02:50
  • 11The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 2 "50 Years Later, the Year 1979": XI. March of the Pioneers02:12
  • 12The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 2 "50 Years Later, the Year 1979": XII. Flourish00:09
  • 13The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 2 "50 Years Later, the Year 1979": XIII. March of the City Elders00:49
  • 14The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 2 "50 Years Later, the Year 1979": XIV: Waltz No. 200:46
  • 15The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a, Pt. 2 "50 Years Later, the Year 1979": XV. Closing March02:01
  • Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald):
  • 16Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 1, Introduction01:58
  • 17Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 2, Distribution of Arms00:59
  • 18Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 3, Interlude No. 100:21
  • 19Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 4, How Long Will My Heart Ache and Moan?02:00
  • 20Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 5, Intermezzo00:54
  • 21Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 6, Soldiers' March01:40
  • 22Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 7, March. Scherzando01:39
  • 23Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 8, How Long Will My Heart Ache and Moan?01:53
  • 24Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 9, Waltz01:44
  • 25Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 10, Interlude No. 200:40
  • 26Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 11, Morning March00:48
  • 27Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 12, Drunken Soldier00:21
  • 28Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 13, Domestic Mayhem01:16
  • 29Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 14, A Team of Women02:17
  • 30Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 15, Soldier's Murder02:19
  • 31Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 16, Women Go Down the Mine01:08
  • 32Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 17, Death in the Mines01:00
  • 33Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 18, The Funeral03:03
  • 34Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 19, Dramatic Chords00:37
  • 35Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 20, Passing the Time01:03
  • 36Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 21, Greeting the Red Army Men00:59
  • 37Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 22, Fanfare00:17
  • 38Love and Hate, Op. 38 (Reconstr. M. Fitz-Gerald): No. 23, Finale00:51
  • Total Runtime58:15

Info zu Shostakovich: The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a & Love and Hate, Op. 38

Shostakovich was still a young composer when he was hired to provide incidental music for The Bedbug, a surreal and farcical satire on Communist utopian dreams and bourgeois corruption and vulgarity. He produced a terrifically knockabout score that draws on local fireman's bands and American dance music. Illustrated by Shostakovich's powerful middle-period music, Love and Hate is a film about female fortitude set in a mining village during the 1919 Civil War. The innovative score, newly reconstructed by Mark Fitz-Gerald from rough piano sketches and the 1935 soundtrack, combines symphonic sections with popular songs.

Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz
Mark Fitz-Gerald, conductor




Deutsche Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz
(German State Philharmonic Orchestra of Rhineland-Palatinate) was founded in Landau in 1919 and has been a state company of the State of Rhineland-Palatinate since 1998. The Staatsphilharmonie is the largest and most important orchestra of the state, thus contributing to the basic symphonic provision in the Palatinate. It is also considered the symphony orchestra of the metropolitan region Rhine-Neckar. Regionally and internationally, it acts as the envoy of the State of Rhineland-Palatinate. Its stylistic range extends from the great symphonies over music theatre productions to film music and silent film projects.

Even during its founding years, with conductors such as Richard Strauss and Hermann Abendroth, the orchestra drew cross-regional attention to itself. In particular, principal conductors like Christoph Eschenbach and Leif Segerstam – today the honorary conductor of the orchestra – helped the orchestra gain an international reputation. Karl-Heinz Steffens has borne artistic responsibility since the summer of 2009. On his initiative and under his aegis, productions have included the multi-year cycle ‘Beethoven and the 20th Century’ and the nationally heeded ‘RING Halle Ludwigshafen’. The metropolitan region summer music festival MODERN TIMES with a focus at the beginning of the season on music of the 20th century and the summer residence of the orchestra in Speyer also began under Steffen’s aegis and annually bring together music lovers from the region and celebrated international artists at different locations.

As of the 2014/15 season, Karl-Heinz Steffens and the Staatsphilharmonie will perform all the symphonies by Anton Bruckner in a cycle lasting several years; the co-operation partners in the project are the respective cathedral choirs, the KathedralKlänge and the Rhineland-Palatinate Cultural Summer. The activities in the metropolitan region will be further expanded with the series REBELLION IM QUADRAT (Mannheim & Karlsruhe School) with new co-operation partners such as the Capitol in Mannheim or the Ludwigshafen Friedenskirche. In a pioneering co-operation with the label Capriccio & DeutschlandRadio Kultur, portraits of composers of the 20th century are being released under the title MODERN TIMES. A recording of the symphonies by Robert Schumann was published by Coviello a few weeks ago.

As the state orchestra, the 88 musicians of the Staatsphilharmonie can be experienced especially in the southern part of the Rhineland-Palatinate. Subscription series of the orchestra take place in the state capital Mainz, in the Rosengarten in Mannheim and in the Concert House in Karlsruhe. In its ‘residential city’ of Ludwigshafen, the Staatsphilharmonie is equally present with its philharmonic concerts in the concert hall of the Pfalzbau and in the BASF Feierabendhaus.

In addition, the orchestra contributes to international music life with many guest appearances. The Staatsphilharmonie holds regular guest concerts in the major concert halls in and outside Europe and is a popular guest at major international music festivals.

Mark Robert Fitz-Gerald
(born in Bromley, Kent 5th September 1954) is a British conductor. His father, Terence Robert (Bob) Fitz-Gerald (direct descendent of the Duke of Leinster, Ireland) became a fully qualified dental surgeon who opened a practice in Bromley which consisted of 3 surgeries. He married Pauline, née Porth, in 1948. Her father, Charles, was of German (Rhineland-Pfalz) origin, whose family name Port was anglicised when they moved to Britain in the 1880s. Mark has one brother, Scott, born in 1963. Musical relatives include Arthur Leavins, whom Mark knew well, and Paul Beard, both orchestral violin leaders. The extended family summer holidays (often in tents or camping vans) were ambitious, visiting many areas where they were sometimes the first tourists – not only most of Europe, but also Russia (and other areas behind the Iron Curtain), USA and Canada. This gave Mark great confidence to return to these countries later in his career. It also gave him some basic knowledge of several languages; in particular the Cyrillic alphabet which would be of great use later on.

As a young child Mark already took a keen interest in music, constantly listening to classics on 78 records, light music on the radio and later hymn-singing at school assemblies. Whilst at Dulwich College Preparatory School the Head of Music, Roy Thackray’s close-up demonstration of several orchestral instruments gave Mark a determination to take up music as soon as he was admitted to Dulwich College (1965 – 1973). Alan Morgan (Director of Music) encouraged Mark to join the school choir for the two annual concerts, one at the Royal Festival Hall and the other at the Fairfield Halls. Mark also attended school orchestra rehearsals and was asked to play bass drum, moving later to glockenspiel and xylophone. He took up piano lessons with Martin Ball. Once Mark’s sight-reading had reached an acceptable level, he was given extra time to explore much of the orchestral repertoire in piano duet form, including little known works such as the complete symphonies of Joachim Raff and Albéric Magnard. He soon took up bassoon with Wendy Robinson plus double bass with Christopher Field and later viola with David Price. His contemporaries at the school included Andrew Watkinson, violin, and Anthony Pople who died in 2003. Anthony Pople had prolific knowledge of 20th century music, in particular Alban Berg, who was to become one of Mark’s favourite composers. During this period, pursuing a conducting career became his main priority. For his last concert at the school, Mark was asked to play the Mozart bassoon concerto at the RFH in June 1973. A private LP was made of this performance. To prepare for this Mark had a very successful meeting with Archie Camden at his home in Cricklewood for guidance and permission to use Archie’s own cadenzas, which was given, contributing to a very successful performance.

During his time at Dulwich and after, as well as his parents, several other relatives gave him great support. Both his paternal grandparents took him regularly to the LPO Eastbourne concerts as well as the Royal Opera House. Auntie Pamela took him every Christmas to the Nutcracker ballet at the RFH. Auntie Olive took him both to English National Opera and the Royal Opera House. Uncle Anthony Merryn (this was his pen name, real name Anthony Bull) was the son of a well-known Victorian music hall banjo soloist. Uncle Anthony was a regular opera critic for ‘the Stage’ magazine and took Mark to many opera premieres at the Royal Opera House, always in the best stall seats. During his school years, Mark won several local talent prizes and joined several local music groups, in particular Bromley Symphony Orchestra, led by Stanley Castle (LSO) and conducted by John Couling (BBC SO – principal viola) whose baton, rehearsal and interpretative styles were very rewarding to learn from. Also during this period, Old Alleynian Dr William Reed (born 1910, Director of Music at Westminster Theatre and also responsible for creating a volume of the world’s national anthems and updating it through 10 volumes) came to judge several house music competitions. Dr Reed had regular musical Sunday events at his theatre which Mark attended regularly. Through their friendship, Will widened Mark’s knowledge of orchestral repertoire through his enormous personal library of scores and recordings which were handed over to Mark bit by bit until Will’s death in 2002. For conducting experiences he was encouraged to visit Mrs Dorothy Crump’s Oaks Farm Orchestra and her enormous library of orchestral music at regular sight-reading sessions on Sunday afternoons. She was proud that it had taken place for over 60 years and that they had never given a concert. It was there that Mark first met Jonathan Del Mar … a rewarding friendship which still continues. Mark was a member of the London Schools Symphony Orchestra from 1973 to 1977 conducted by Peter Fletcher and the Wind Ensemble conducted by Alan Cave, where his double bassoon playing first started. This period was a joyful and steep learning curve, surrounded by a high standard of playing, musicians destined for major careers, many of whom became Mark’s lifelong friends. The orchestra had extensive French and German tours covering a broad repertoire. It reached a peak in Mark’s final RFH concert with them when playing first bassoon in Shostakovich’s 12th Symphony. Mark’s lifelong admiration for the composer’s works started here. Peter Fletcher took over as Director of Music of the Leicestershire Schools Symphony Orchestra. Mark was invited to become woodwind coach for their courses.



Booklet für Shostakovich: The Bedbug Suite, Op. 19a & Love and Hate, Op. 38

© 2010-2019 HIGHRESAUDIO